The Ivory Child (1916) Review

The Ivory ChildThe Ivory Child by H. Rider Haggard
My rating: 5 of 5 stars

When I take all the H. Rider Haggard books that I have read, The Ivory child stands out to me as one that almost unseats Allan Quatermain as my favorite of his works. The Ivory child was an amazingly told story about two ancient religions and their symbols fighting each other and Allan was only there with a friend to try and save the man’s wife.

It had everything you had come to expect from a Haggard novel, but this book had even more including references to previous books of him, and they came together in a beautiful finale.

As with many of Haggard’s books, there can be a lot of monologuing, but I found it sparse and easy to get through in this novel. It is especially fun if you have already read Allan and the Holy Flower as there are discussions and re-occurring characters from that story.

I am giving this book five stars because I feel that it is a five-star book and I look forward to reliving that adventure again one day.

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She (1887) Review

She (She, #1)She by H. Rider Haggard
My rating: 3 of 5 stars

I have been a fan of H. Rider Haggard’s work for quite a number of years though my reading of his works have been limited. For a time, I absolutely loved his King Solomon’s Mines and the sequel Allan Quartermain. When I discovered that the books were available in audiobook from from librivox.org, I had to download the other ones and read through them.

This book, She, has been on my list for quite sometime knowing that it has influenced many other writers like C.S. Lewis’ Queen Jadis and “She who must be obeyed” has been a line used in a few movies.

I found this book to be a rip-roar adventure just like H. Rider Haggard’s other works but found the story weaker than his other works. Ayesha was characterized very well and I thought the character was very fascinating. The problem I had the most was the ending. Though I won’t go into detail, it felt like the writer had accidentally designed a too powerful character and had to use a dues ex machina to solve the story beat.

This book is fascinating to read in the collection of imperial Victorian literature of the time and though our modern perceptions have changed and can consider this book racist, I found that H. Rider Haggard had kept it to a minimum focusing more on a story in Africa than anything else. If you can look past these, I think you will find a very interesting story.

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The Thing From the Lake (1921) Review

The Thing From the LakeThe Thing From the Lake by Eleanor Marie Ingram
My rating: 5 of 5 stars

When I first picked up this title, I did it only because the title sounded interesting and unusual for books from the 1920s. I have a personal like for the older literature as it gives you an interesting look into our past.

The Thing From the Lake was a book that caught me off guard. I found the story to be very intriguing once you have gotten to the 20s style of flowery words and digressions in thought that would typically be cut out of books today.

I found that this book read to me like one of the first types of supernatural/science fiction type stories where what you would expect doesn’t turn out the way you thought. I was completely caught off by the (good) ending.

The book has some things that could be considered issues nowadays. As it was written in the 1920s, the opinion and way women are portrayed my strike a wrong chord with the modern reader. Though Ms. Ingram does well of giving her female leads personality, they do conform more of the cute, need-to-be-rescued type damsels though they do have action of their own and aren’t “sexy lamps” that could be easily replaced.

I enjoyed this book and look forward to rereading it one day.

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